Wednesday, 13 Dec, 2017
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Language And Phrases in Georgia

One of the existing 14 alphabets on the world is Georgian. Mkhedruli, the script for modern Georgian, consists of 33 letters (5 vowels and 28 consonants) and is written from left to right. As is common in many other scripts, spaces are used to separate words. Words are emphasized by increasing their intracharacter spacing. While all letters of the Georgian alphabet sit on a baseline, some also have ascenders, descenders or both. Georgian has no feature corresponding to the distinction of upper and lower case. In a special "headline" style, all parts of each letter are made to sit on the baseline, in some cases resulting in a change of proportions in the letterform. The first attested form of Georgian script (Asomtavruli) dates back to the 5th century AD. After the 9th century, a new, more angular style called "Kutkhovani" gradually replaced "Asomtavruli". By the 10th century, the first variants of the current, more rounded style, Mkhedruli, began to appear. In the 13th century, Mkhedruli became an established style which was used in secular writing only. In 1669, Mkhedruli was first set in print. Since its inception, Georgian script has undergone some changes in two main stages. In the 18th century, Anton I introduced some minor changes, while in the 1860s Ilia Chavchavadze dropped 5 symbols which were no longer needed for the phonology of Georgian. Since the independence of the Republic of Georgia in 1990, new efforts are underway to standardize the script to support the needs of the various factions of Georgian society. Tacking its entire history into consideration, the Georgian alphabet has changed very little. This stability is in large part due to the good design of the alphabet: each letter corresponds to a unique phoneme and each phoneme is written by on letter only.
Everyday Phrases
English Georgian
Mr. Batono
Mrs.(Miss) Qalbatono
Good morning! Dila mshvidobisa!
Good afternoon! Shuadge mshvidobisa!
Good evening! Sagamo mshvidobisa!
Hello! Gamarjoba!
Good bye! Nakhvamdis!
See you soon Momaval shekhvedramde
Thank you! Gmadlobt!
Thank you very much! Didi madloba!
Not at all! Araphris!
Yes Diakh
No Ara
Very good Dzalian kargi
Excuse me Ukatsravad
Sorry Mapatiet
Of course Ra tkma unda
With pleasure Siamovnebit
I am in your country for the first time Me pirvelad var tqvens qvekanashi
What's your name? Ra gkviat?
My name is ... Chemi sakhelia ....
How old are you? Ramdeni tslis khart?
Where do you work? Sad mushaobt?
Where do you live? Sad tskhovrobt?
What is the time? Romeli saatia?

Calendar
English Georgian
What day is it today? Ra dgea dges?
Monday Orshabati
Tuesday Samshabati
Wednesday Otkhshabati
Thursday Khutshabati
Friday Paraskevi
Saturday Shabati
Sunday Kvira
January Ianvari
February Tebervali
March Marti
April Aprili
May Maisi
June Ivnisi
July Ivlisi
August Agvisto
September Seqtemberi
October Oqtomberi
November Noemberi
December Dekemberi